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Quality Month 2016 “Pollinating Improvement” Poster Applications Due July 1

Posted on June 24, 2016

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Join other problem-solvers throughout the academic medical center to celebrate the work of process improvement teams across the health system with a poster exhibit in the Towsley Lobby, a highlight of the Quality Month celebration on October 4 and 5. 

We invite teams that have completed at least one round of improvement using the Plan-Do-Check-Adjust cycles of improvement to submit an application by July 1 representing their work. Teams that can demonstrate multiple cycles of improvement are especially encouraged to submit an application, highlighting successive experiments.

The theme of “Pollinating Improvements” highlights the importance both of using the experience of others sharing similar problems as the team begins the improvement process and sharing the results of experiments to the advantage of others who may be addressing similar problems in their workplace. This poster session is one way to Pollinate Improvements as well as a way to recognize and celebrate the work of staff who have invested in our success as an organization by improving the work they do every day.

The application process and a template for application to participate are located at the Quality Month website.

Workshop: Communicating Science to Non-Scientists

Posted on June 24, 2016

Faculty often have to describe their research to non-scientists such as donors or media.  This can often prove difficult when the employee is fully immersed in the science.  Back by popular demand, Jean-luc Doumont will come to the university for a new session on communication and offer advice that works well for addressing both scientists and nonscientists alike. 

Doumont is an articulate, entertaining, and thought-provoking speaker who successfully reaches a wide range of audiences worldwide, as a trainer or an invited speaker at companies, top-ranked universities, research laboratories and major conferences. He is an engineer from the Louvain School of Engineering in Belgium and holds a Ph.D. in applied physics from Stanford University.

Breakfast will be provided.

When: Monday, October 10

Time: 8 a.m. – 10 a.m.

Where: BSRB Seminar Rooms (1st floor)

Register online

This workshop is hosted by the Office of Faculty Development. Please note that this workshop is for faculty only. Questions? Please contact Julia Walsh, walshju@umich.edu.

Website: http://faculty.medicine.umich.edu/workshops/communicating-science-non-scientists

Workshop: Making the Most of Your Presentation

Posted on June 24, 2016

Making the most of your presentation requires a systematic approach to preparing and delivering effective oral presentations, especially at conferences. Among others, this approach covers structure, slides, delivery and stage fright. It also endeavors to be a model of the principles it advocates – an oral presentation that attendees can learn from by way of example.

The facilitator, Jean-luc Doumont, is an articulate, entertaining, and thought-provoking speaker who successfully reaches a wide range of audiences worldwide, as a trainer or invited speaker at companies, top-ranked universities, research laboratories, and major conferences. He is an engineer from the Louvain School of Engineering in Belgium and holds a Ph.D. in applied physics from Stanford University.

Lunch will be provided.

When: Monday, October 10

Time: 11 a.m.– 1 p.m.

Where: BSRB Seminar Rooms (1st floor)

Register online

This workshop is hosted by the Office of Faculty Development. Please note that this workshop is for faculty only. Questions? Please contact Julia Walsh, walshju@umich.edu.

Website: http://faculty.medicine.umich.edu/workshops/making-most-your-presentation

See something, say something: Hospital security is everyone’s business

Posted on June 24, 2016

The No. 1 priority for all members of the UMHS community is to keep each other and our patients safe. In light of the recent tragedy at the Orlando nightclub, it’s more important than ever to remind people that security is everyone’s business.

“We have no information about any specific threat in our community, but we take safety and security seriously every day. We are always reinforcing the importance of vigilance to our colleagues. We talk about it extensively,” said Sgt. Gary Hicks of the U-M Police Department, who also serves as a community outreach supervisor.

The June 12 nightclub shooting in Orlando killed 49 victims and wounded dozens more. Within police and security circles, such incidents are called “active shooter” scenarios. U-M Police, like all police departments, train for them. There’s a U-M Public Safety website with specific information about what people should do in such a situation, and the department also gives occasional presentations on the topic around campus.

“If you’d like us to give a presentation in your area, we’d be happy to do that. The main thing to remember is that you have three options: run, hide or fight – in that order,” said Sgt. Hicks.

“But even more important than that, we want colleagues to call us so we can respond before a situation has an opportunity to become potentially dangerous,” he said.

In addition to the U-M Police Department, UMHS security has well-trained officials ready to help you in any scenario. The UMHS security office number is ext. 6-7890. When and why should you call? Aside from the obvious, such as when someone seems unusually agitated or angry, there are several things to watch for, according to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security:

Unusual items or situations: A vehicle is parked in an odd location, unattended luggage or packages, an open window or door that is usually closed – these are just a few examples.

Eliciting information: Be wary of people with questions that go beyond mere curiosity, especially inquiries about a building’s purpose, operations, security procedures and/or personnel or shift changes.

Observation/surveillance: Watch out for someone paying unusual attention to facilities or buildings beyond a casual or professional interest. This includes extended loitering without explanation (particularly in non-public locations); unusual, repeated, and/or prolonged observation of a building (e.g., with binoculars or video camera); taking notes or measurements; counting paces; sketching floor plans, etc.

“We can’t stress it enough: if you encounter someone or something that seems out of place or strange, say something,” Sgt. Hicks said. “You’re not bugging us. We want you to let us know.”

 

Canton #1 Vanpool has immediate opening!

Posted on June 24, 2016

Canton Kroger @ Ford and Canton Center Rd
6:45am

Mott P4 Medical Campus
7:20am

Mott P4 Medical Campus
4:50pm

Canton Kroger @ Ford and Canton Center Rd
5:2pm

jquaine@med.umich.edu

Colorful Choices: An easy way to eat smarter

Posted on June 23, 2016

It may be the simplest nutrition program ever – no calorie or fat gram counting, no weighing and no measuring. In Colorful Choices, a point-based program, your goal is to eat at least 3½ cups of produce each day – in red, orange, yellow/white, green and blue/violet. Each time you do so, you’ll earn points.

A diet rich with fruits and vegetables is exceptionally healthy and can increase energy while also reducing your risk of obesity, heart disease, some cancers, diabetes and hypertension.

Earn points by tracking your progress online for six weeks, July 12 – August 22. Track online using a computer or mobile device like a smart phone or tablet (once registered, you will receive information on how to download the App).

Colorful Choices is open to benefits-eligible faculty and staff. It also qualifies for MHealthy Rewards – simply earn at least 200 points by August 22.

Register today!

Website: https://hr.umich.edu/benefits-wellness/health/mhealthy/physical-well-being/nutrition

Former boxer gives brain tumor a counterpunch

Posted on June 23, 2016

Retired professional boxer Kat Brauer Rice knew she always had to leave it all in the ring. “Krackin’ Kat” never gave up.

Rice, now a wife and mother of two, used those hard-hitting lessons from her boxing career — and her time as a college basketball player — in recent years to give a full nelson to her brain tumor.

Twice.

For a take-no-prisoners athlete who went 5-1 in the boxing ring, this medical fight was a deeply personal rematch.

“The second time, when I came to the University of Michigan, I said: ‘We’re going the distance,’” says Rice, a former boxer at Detroit’s legendary Kronk Gym who now lives in metro Detroit. “Round two needed to go down at U-M.”

Click here to learn about Rice’s experience through surgery and the Functional Wellness Clinic with Dr. Shawn Hervey-Jumper.

Website: http://umhealth.me/23g4EJv

Simple urine test leads to early detection of kidney disease

Posted on June 23, 2016

Only 5 percent of people in the United States are aware that they have early-stage kidney disease, according to a recent study by Jennifer Bragg-Gresham, M.S., Ph.D., a research scientist at the University of Michigan and her colleagues. The study findings were presented at the National Kidney Foundation’s 2016 Spring Clinical Meetings.

“The most striking finding for us was how many individuals in the U.S. have early kidney disease, but are unaware of their disease,” Bragg-Gresham says.

The authors estimate that about 14.5 million people are undiagnosed and untreated for early stages of kidney disease.

However, a simple urine test can readily detect protein in the urine (albuminuria) even before more sophisticated tests show that the kidneys are no longer filtering waste properly. The authors note that early treatment can slow progression and reduce the severity of kidney disease and other health risk factors.

Read more about the study in these articles:

“Albuminuria ups death risk despite normal renal function,” in Renal & Urology News

“Albuminuria doubles mortality risk even in patients without reduction in kidney function,” in Nephrology News & Issues.