Archives

Picture This: Empowering craniofacial anomalies patients

Posted on September 21, 2015

By Christian Vercler, M.D.

Children with craniofacial anomalies spend a great deal of time in their doctor’s office being evaluated and treated. Every visit involves having photographs taken. Not fun pictures. Not even school headshots. But pictures focused on their facial differences.

It’s what is sometimes called the “clinical gaze.” We are carefully examining their facial differences, focusing on them and working to help fix them. In a way, it can be depersonalizing even though my colleagues and I at the Craniofacial Anomalies Program work hard to connect with the children in ways other than their facial differences.

See full blog post and video here.

Video Link: Our Path Forward

Posted on September 21, 2015

A Message for Marschall S. Runge, M.D., Ph.D.

Colleagues,

Last week I shared my thoughts about our future direction and some of the new leadership positions we will be adding to the health system. To summarize that information, I’ve created a video that hits the highlights.  I hope you’ll take a few minutes to watch it:  http://www.med.umich.edu/u/evpma/

RungeScreen.fw

I’m very excited about our path forward and all of the incredible opportunities before us.  Other leaders and I will be sharing more information as we continue our planning process.

Thank you for the work you do every day.

Sincerely,
Marschall

Don’t forget: Active U Autumn starts tomorrow!

Posted on September 21, 2015

Starting tomorrow, thousands of university faculty, staff and students will track their time walking, doing yoga, going to the gym or playing a sport, determined to reach their weekly exercise goal in Active U Autumn.

If you haven’t already, don’t forget to register for MHealthy’s annual fall physical activity challenge and charity fundraiser. Sign up as an individual, join a team, or create your own team by inviting your colleagues and friends to register.

Active U Autumn uses team camaraderie, peer motivation and online tracking to encourage participants to be active at least three days a week and work toward achieving their weekly personal exercise goal.

This year’s program includes two major updates:

  • Fitbit compatible – participants can now sync their Fitbit to the online tracker
  • Two weeks longer – Active U Autumn is now eight weeks (Sept. 22 – Nov. 16) instead of six

Other program highlights include:

  • Charity donation – make an optional small donation through the program to support charities chosen by participants
  • Convenient ways to log – participants can still use a computer or mobile device to track their exercise.  They now can also input their time via text message
  • Prizes – chances to win prizes by logging minutes or sharing photos on social media

For extra motivation, Active U Autumn is one of several health and wellness programs offered this fall that qualify for the MHealthy Grand Prize Drawing. Benefits-eligible faculty and staff and their U-M health plan enrolled spouses/OQAs can enter for a chance to win $500 to support their healthy behaviors. Six will win.

Sign up by Sept. 22 at mhealthy.umich.edu/autumn. Tracking starts Sept. 22 and continues for eight weeks.

U-M Health System announces plans to reposition itself for greater integration, improved patient care

Posted on September 17, 2015

The University of Michigan Health System – which includes three hospitals, the health centers, many basic science research departments and the UM Medical School – will be further integrated under a strategic approach outlined today to strengthen the university’s three-part health care mission of patient care, research and education.

Marschall Runge, M.D., Ph.D., Executive Vice President for Medical Affairs

Marschall Runge, M.D., Ph.D., Executive Vice President for Medical Affairs

The plan was outlined during a Board of Regents meeting by President Mark Schlissel, himself a physician-scientist, along with the head of U-M Health System, Dr. Marschall Runge. They noted that increased integration and collaboration, guided by a restructured leadership team, is necessary for the U-M Health System to remain competitive in today’s fast-paced and ever-changing health care marketplace.

In his introduction to the changes, the president said greater integration will help the university’s world-class health system better respond to rapid changes in the health care industry and to ongoing competitive challenges. “We are living in one of the most dynamic periods for health care in the last century, and possibly in human history. We have more to offer patients than ever before, especially at academic medical centers such as ours,” Schlissel added.

“Our ability to stay competitive depends on our ability to attract and retain the best faculty, compete successfully for research funding and deliver high quality, in-demand medical care in a cost-efficient manner. These factors place an increased premium on our ability to work across our institution in a seamless, integrated, collaborative fashion,” he said.

James O. Woolliscroft, M.D.

James O. Woolliscroft, M.D.

Regents approved the leadership changes recommended by Schlissel and Runge. All will take effect January 1, 2016.

“Our institution must evolve as well to continue to remain a leading provider of quality health care, and to enhance our efforts to convert what we learn through research in our medical school into better care for our patients,” said Regent Shauna Ryder Diggs, a physician and chair of the board’s Health Affairs Committee. “The vision described today helps us do this by making the most of what I consider our main strength — our tripartite mission of patient care, research and education.”

Runge, currently the university’s executive vice president for medical affairs, will assume additional responsibility as dean of the Medical School. Bringing together the EVPMA and dean roles will naturally increase collaboration between faculty and staff in the Medical School and their colleagues in hospitals and health centers, the president noted.

David Spahlinger, M.D.

David Spahlinger, M.D.

Schlissel thanked Dr. James Woolliscroft, the current Medical School Dean, for his nearly 40 years of service to the university and pointed out his innovation in redesigning the Medical School curriculum and the school’s consistently top ranking among U.S. medical schools.

Regents also approved two new positions to the health system, as proposed by Runge.  Dr. David Spahlinger will be promoted to executive vice dean for clinical affairs and president of the hospitals, health centers and the U-M Medical Group. Spahlinger currently is senior associate dean and head of the faculty group practice and oversees the ambulatory care centers.  In his new role he will report directly to Runge.

T. Anthony Denton, currently acting CEO of the hospitals and health centers, will be promoted to senior vice president and chief operating officer for hospitals, health centers and the U-M Medical Group. He will report to Spahlinger.

In recommending these changes, Runge said that strong leaders are essential for the future as the health system pursues strategic priorities designed to help the system operate seamlessly as a single enterprise.

T. Anthony Denton

T. Anthony Denton, J.D., M.H.A.

“Critical to our success,” said Runge, “is our ability to attract and cultivate strong leaders.  We must have leaders who are change agents, willing to take risks, encourage innovation, and who can turn new ideas into daily practice.”

As the health system continues a process of assessment and review of priorities, additional top leaders will be named in academic affairs and education programs, the research enterprise and information technology.

Runge said that since coming to U-M in March, he has learned “that Michigan is a great institution with exceptional people at all levels of faculty and staff.” But he said he also believed U-M can be better.

“We have the energy, resources and talent to re-establish a performance record that reflects continuous improvement and innovation.  Now is the time to do this, by focusing on enterprise-wide collaboration that will strengthen our performance in our hospitals and health centers, Medical School and research facilities.  Doing this should lead to better patient care.”

Balance Awareness Week: Dizziness is not normal

Posted on September 17, 2015

Some loss of balance as you age is to be expected, but balance issues don’t have to be a fact of life, say the vestibular therapists at the U-M Vestibular Testing Center, part of the Vertigo & Balance Disorders program in the Department of Otolaryngology- Head and Neck Surgery.

Sept.14 through 20 is Balance Awareness Week, and vestibular certified physical therapists Wendy Carender, PT, NCS, and Melissa Grzesiak, PT, DPT recommend people see their doctor if balance or vertigo is getting in the way of their regular life. Many physicians will then refer patients to the physical therapists and audiologists at the Vestibular Testing Center for evaluation and treatment.

“I personally used to go in and see Wendy very often, so much that I suggested they set up an office for me there. I was a regular pest,” said Harold Johnson, 89, who dealt with a variety of balance and vertigo issues as he aged, in addition to a history of Meniere’s disease and a cochlear implant.

Carender educated Johnson in specific exercises to reduce his dizziness and improve his balance and sent him home with a customized home exercise program.  He finds his balance has improved so much that he rarely requires a visit anymore.

“The majority of our patients with dizziness and balance disorders benefit from an individualized home exercise program,” Carender said. “We’re teaching them to move through the dizziness in order to desensitize and decrease symptoms while promoting return to functional activity.”

Read more in the blog: http://umhealth.me/BalanceAwarenessWk

Register for Active U Autumn – Starts Sept. 22

Posted on September 17, 2015

Registration is now open for MHealthy’s annual fall physical activity challenge and charity fundraiser. Active U Autumn uses team camaraderie, peer motivation, and online tracking to encourage participants to be active at least three days a week and work toward achieving their weekly personal exercise goal. Participants can choose to sign up as an individual, join a team, or create their own team by inviting colleagues and friends to register.

This year’s program includes two major updates:

  • Fitbit compatible – participants can now sync their Fitbit to the online tracker
  • Two weeks longer – Active U Autumn is now eight weeks (Sept. 22 – Nov.16) instead of six

Other program highlights include:

  • Charity donation – make an optional small donation through the program to support charities chosen by participants
  • Convenient ways to log – participants can still use a computer or mobile device to track their exercise.  They now can also input their time via text message
  • Prizes – chances to win prizes by logging minutes or sharing photos on social media

For extra motivation, Active U Autumn is one of several health and wellness programs offered this fall that qualify for the MHealthy Grand Prize Drawing. Benefits-eligible faculty and staff and their U-M health plan enrolled spouses/OQAs can enter for a chance to win $500 to support their healthy behaviors. Six will win.

Sign up by Sept. 22 at mhealthy.umich.edu/autumn. Tracking starts Sept. 22 and continues for eight weeks.

Tomorrow, join MHealthy at two events: Employee Recognition Fun Walk/Run and the Beautiful Break event

Posted on September 17, 2015

Tomorrow, Sept. 18, MHealthy has planned two events meant to jumpstart your morning and then keep you relax, refreshed and inspired the rest of the day.

Employee Recognition Fun Walk/Run, 7 – 8:30 a.m.
Join MHealthy from 7 – 8:30 a.m. at Nichols Arboretum and participate in a one-mile walk/run or a three-mile run. You’ll go into the rest of your workday focused and energized. The starting line is at the Pit Entrance to the Arb. View map of the walk/run route.

Beautiful Break event, 11 a.m. – 2 p.m.
Then from 11 a.m. – 2 p.m., you’re invited to experience a Beautiful Break, a special event designed to relax, refresh and inspire you. The event takes place at Dow Auditorium and the lobby.

Stop by anytime to:

  • Create through art
  • Connect with friends and colleagues
  • Calm yourself through movement and meditation
  • Savor delicious, nourishing foods
  • Accept a special gift as a reminder to thrive

All it takes is a few minutes – you’ll come away feeling more refreshed, relaxed and set with new ways to create your own beautiful break, every day.

Learn more about these events.

The Beautiful Break events and the Walk/Run are among several health and well-being programs this fall that qualify for the MHealthy Grand Prize Drawing. Benefits-eligible faculty and staff and their U-M health plan enrolled spouses/OQAs can enter for a chance to win $500 to support their healthy behaviors. Six will win.

Website: http://www.mhealthy.umich.edu/beautiful-break

One year infection-free: Congrats to the PCTU!

Posted on September 16, 2015

One of the most common hospital acquired infections, central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI) lead to thousands of illnesses and deaths. They happen when the catheter tube (central line) used to give patients medicines and fluids or collect blood samples, lets germs into the bloodstream.

The Pediatric Cardiothoracic Intensive Care Unit (PCTU) at C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital is the latest UMHS team to go more than a year without a central line infection.

The 30-bed unit provides intensive observation and specialized nursing care for critically ill patients with congenital or acquired heart disease as part of the U-M Congenital Heart Center. Treating patients of all ages, including those who are young and very ill, makes infection prevention efforts all the more important. PCTU is the third UMHS team this year that’s gone 365 days without an infection.

.PTCUgroup

PCTU staff were awarded by Jeff Desmond, M.D., interim chief medical officer, and Marge Calarco, Ph.D., RN, senior associate director and chief of nursing services Wednesday

“We are so proud to see another team truly exemplifying our commitment to patient safety,” says Calarco.

“We’re honored to present the 365 Days of Safety Award to PCTU,” adds Dr. Desmond. “This unit is setting an example for us all on best practices and infection prevention methods.”

How they did it:

PCTU staff were awarded by Jeff Desmond, M.D., interim chief medical officer, and Marge Calarco, Ph.D., RN, senior associate director and chief of nursing services Wednesday.

PCTU staff were awarded by Jeff Desmond, M.D., interim chief medical officer, and Marge Calarco, Ph.D., RN, senior associate director and chief of nursing services Wednesday.

The equipment used in the PCTU helps sustain life but can also increase the risk of infection. As a result, staff in the area work hard to prevent infections and have consistently achieved low infection rates compared to national benchmarks.

“The exceptional work to reduce infections has only occurred through the diligent, collaborative, engaged and focused efforts of the entire PCTU team,” explains PCTU Nurse Manager Colleen M. Rosenberg, MSN, RN, CNML.

Colleen says CLABSI improvement efforts have been in place in the unit since 2008, but really took hold in 2012 when several of their nursing leaders came together after a Children’s Hospital Association meeting enthused and full of ideas. They developed a plan for staff education, outlined problem areas and goals, and established specific, evidence-based practices to teach their teams. They conducted education sessions and 1:1 learning sessions about new practices and served as bedside resources for their peers by role modeling and teaching best practices. Improvements were also reinforced through rewards and recognition events on the unit.

The PCTU team continues to conduct bedside line rounds and audits to reinforce best practices and to assure their efforts are continued.

“I would like to thank our PCTU nurses (including our pediatric critical care nurses), Intensive Care Unit techs, unit hosts, Cardiology and Surgery faculty, fellows, nurse practitioners, clerks, Environmental Services team, Clinical Engineering colleagues, Jackie White from Infection Prevention, Katie Nelson, our CLABSI provider lead, our clinician assistants, our Material Services and line cart team, and our Anesthesia partners,” Colleen says. “Under the superb leadership of our CLABSI Nurse Champions Christen Ikerd, Emily Miller, Lisa Beckman and Kim Kurzeja, and with the guidance and support of PCTU Educational Nurse Coordinator Connie Coast, we continue to commit ourselves to the goal of preventing harm in our vulnerable patients.”

Medical School faculty and staff to receive Dean’s Awards

Posted on September 16, 2015

Each year, the Medical School recognizes exceptional accomplishments by faculty and staff in the areas of teaching, research, clinical care, innovation, community service and administration.

This year’s honorees — 18 faculty and three staff members — were nominated by colleagues, and selected to receive Dean’s Awards for their commitment to the school’s mission of excellence in education, research and patient care.

They will be recognized Nov.4 at the annual Faculty and Staff Awards Dinner in the Omenn Atrium of the A. Alfred Taubman Biomedical Science Research Building.

2015 Dean’s Awards for Faculty

Basic Science Research Award

  • Cristen J. Willer, Ph.D., assistant professor of internal medicine, human genetics, and computational medicine and bioinformatics

Clinical and Health Services Research Award

  • Julie C. Lumeng, M.D., associate professor of pediatrics and communicable diseases
  • Albert P. Rocchini, M.D., Macdonald Dick II, M.D., Research Professor of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases
  • Sanjay K. Saint, M.D., M.P.H., George Dock Collegiate Professor of Internal Medicine

Distinguished Faculty Lectureship Award in Biomedical Research

  • Eric R. Fearon, M.D., Ph.D., Emanuel N. Maisel Professor of Oncology, professor of internal medicine, pathology and human genetics

Innovation and Commercialization Award

  • James A. Shayman, M.D., Agnes C. and Frank D. McKay Professor of Pharmacology and Internal Medicine

Kaiser Permanente Awards for Excellence in Teaching

  • Audrey F. Seasholtz, Ph.D. (pre-clinical), professor of biological chemistry and research professor, Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience Institute
  • Maya M. Hammoud, M.D. (clinical), professor of obstetrics and gynecology, and learning health sciences

Lifetime Achievement Award in Medical Education

  • Henry D. Appelman, M.D., M.R. Abell Professor of Surgical Pathology, professor of pathology

Lifetime Achievement Award in Clinical Care

  • Fred Morady, M.D., McKay Professor of Cardiovascular Disease, professor of internal medicine
  • Patricia L. Robertson, M.D., professor of pediatrics and communicable diseases, and neurology

Medical School Community Service Award

  • M.E. Michele Heisler, M.D. (global), professor of internal medicine
  • Paula Anne Newman-Casey, M.D., M.S. (local), assistant professor of ophthalmology and visual sciences

Outstanding Clinician Award

  • Kevin M. Chan, M.D., professor of internal medicine
  • Avraham Eisbruch, M.D., Newman Family Professor of Radiation Oncology
  • Jon A. Jacobson, M.D., professor of radiology
  • Daniel R. Kaul, M.D., associate professor of internal medicine
  • R. Kevin Reynolds, M.D., George W. Morley Collegiate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology

2015 Dean’s Awards for Staff

Administrator of the Year

  • Masada (Musty) Habhab, chief administrator, Department of Internal Medicine

Professional Staff of the Year

  • Mark Salamango, clinical decision support lead, Department of Emergency Medicine

Support Staff of the Year

  • James Musgrave, student administrative assistant, graduate programs in Cellular and Molecular Biology, Immunology and Cancer Biology

In addition, the following staff have received honorable mention awards:

Administrator of the Year Honorable Mention

  • Bradley R. Densen, administrative director, Office of Medical Student Education
  • Teri A. Grieb, Ph.D., senior director of research, Medical School Office of Research, and managing director, Michigan Institute for Clinical & Health Research

Professional Staff of the Year Honorable Mention

  • Jennifer A. Miner, research area specialist senior, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

Support Staff of the Year Honorable Mention

  • Katie Grode, administrative assistant senior healthcare, Department of Family Medicine
  • Martha Lucza, administrative assistant intermediate healthcare, Division of Anatomical Science
  • Susan Sessions, administrative assistant senior healthcare, Department of Anesthesiology

Website: http://medicine.umich.edu/medschool/about/school-leadership/medical-school-dean/deans-awards-program