FAQs About COVID-19 Vaccines for U-M Faculty, Staff and Students on all Three Campuses

November 23, 2020  //  FOUND IN: Updates & Resources

Last updated: 5 p.m., Wednesday, June 16

This is a rapidly changing area. The information provided is to the best of our knowledge at the time of publication.

More information for PATIENTS can be found on the COVID-19 vaccine section of uofmhealth.org.

More information for U-M STUDENTS can be found on the vaccine information page of the campus blueprint website.

These FAQs are divided into categories. Click on each category to jump to that section:

New questions will be added to the bottom of each section so be sure to look there for the newest information.

Vaccine Progress to Date

Updated information on the total number of vaccines administered and the number of individuals fully vaccinated can be found in this Tableau Dashboard.

The dashboard requires a Level 2 login and updates at 8 a.m. daily with data updated as of midnight.

General vaccine information

Q: What vaccines are available for COVID-19?

A: As of today, three vaccines for COVID-19 have received Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA):

Health care organizations and retail pharmacies across the country, including Michigan Medicine, are currently vaccinating all individuals age 12 years and older, based on recommendations from the CDC and Michigan Department of Health and Human Services. Pfizer is currently the only vaccine option approved by the FDA and CDC for those age 12-15 years.

More information can be found here: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/recommendations-process.html.

Q: How do I register for a vaccine?

A: If you are a Michigan Medicine employee who has not yet received a COVID-19 vaccine, below are options for getting vaccinated:

  • Occupational Health Services (OHS) is currently offering walk-in COVID-19 vaccinations from 7 a.m. – 4 p.m. each day. An employee ID is required to be vaccinated.
  • If you are also a Michigan Medicine patient, you can call the COVID-19 Vaccine Scheduling Call Center at (734) 763-6336 or visit your MyUofMHealth.org patient portal account to schedule an appointment. You can visit https://www.uofmhealth.org/coronavirus/vaccine-info-update for more information. 

If you have any other questions regarding vaccination, please call OHS at (734) 764-8021. 

Q: How long do the vaccines protect against infection?

A: Health care professionals and researchers are still learning about COVID-19 and new information is discovered nearly every day that is helpful in the fight against this disease. Because COVID-19 is still a relatively new virus, it is difficult to know exactly how the virus affects the body long-term and how long immunity from natural infection lasts. Therefore, it is also difficult to predict how long a vaccine will provide protection against the virus. As the vaccines are administered and new information is gathered, additional data about how long it will protect against the virus will be made available. 

Q: Will the vaccine be given annually or is it only for this year?

A: Scientists are continuing to collect data about long-term immunity to SARS-CoV2. However, some vaccine manufacturers have stated that it is likely a booster shot will be needed at some point after the first two vaccine doses. More information will be shared as it becomes available.

Q: If you get the vaccine and become immune, then are exposed to COVID-19, can you pass the virus on to others from your exposure?

A: Based on our experience with other vaccines and early data from the COVID-19 vaccines, it is likely that people who are vaccinated will have enough immunity where they will not pass the virus to others if exposed, but this is not 100 percent certain.

Q: Will masks still be required if you receive the vaccine?

A: Based on outdoor masking guidance on the U-M campus, masks are not required when outdoors at Michigan Medicine when social distancing of six feet or more can be maintained. While it has been determined there is minimal risk for vaccinated individuals, we still must continue to remain cautious and follow these additional guidelines:

  • Outdoor gatherings are still not permitted. 
  • Those with a compromised immune system should continue to mask even if vaccinated and discuss with their medical provider.
  • Masks should still be worn in high traffic areas where social distancing is difficult such as bus stops and building entrances.
  • Masks are still required at all times in any Michigan Medicine buildings.

Please encourage your teams to comply with these requirements and help keep our communities safe. For further information, review Frequently Asked Questions about outdoor masking guidelines. Or check out the article, “Confused About the Latest Mask Rules? Read This” on the Michigan Health blog.

Q: Are there anticipated side effects of the vaccine? If so, what are they?

A: Common side effects that have been reported with available COVID-19 vaccines include:

  • injection site pain
  • tiredness
  • headache
  • muscle pain
  • chills
  • joint pain
  • fever
  • injection site swelling
  • injection site redness
  • nausea
  • feeling unwell
  • swollen lymph nodes (lymphadenopathy)

Side effects of individual COVID-19 vaccines may vary. You can find more information about what to expect after getting vaccinated on the CDC website: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/expect/after.html.

Q: What ingredients are in the Pfizer vaccine? 

A: The Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine contains:

  •  messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) – the main, active ingredient that elicits an immune response and the production of antibodies
  • Lipids (including ((4-hydroxybutyl)azanediyl)bis(hexane-6,1-diyl)bis(2-hexyldecanoate), 2 [(polyethylene glycol)-2000]-N,N-ditetradecylacetamide, 1,2-Distearoyl-sn-glycero-3- phosphocholine, and cholesterol) – an outside coating or shell of fat that protects the mRNA from destruction as it is being stored, administered and delivered to cells
  • Potassium chloride; monobasic potassium phosphate; sodium chloride (salt); dibasic sodium phosphate dehydrate – salts that are used to maintain proper levels of acidity (pH)
  • Sucrose – a sugar that stabilizes the suspension 

Q: What ingredients are in the Moderna vaccine?

A: The Moderna COVID-19 vaccine contains:

  • messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA)- the main, active ingredient that elicits an immune response and the production of antibodies
  • Lipids (SM-102, polyethylene glycol [PEG] 2000 dimyristoyl glycerol [DMG],cholesterol, and 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine [DSPC])- an outside coating or shell of fat that protects the mRNA from destruction as it is being stored, administered and delivered to cells
  • Tromethamine,tromethamine hydrochloride, acetic acid, sodium acetate- used to maintain proper pH
  • Sucrose – a sugar that stabilizes the suspension

Q: What ingredients are in the Janssen (Johnson & Johnson) vaccine?

A: The Janssen COVID-19 vaccine contains:

  • Recombinant, replication-incompetent adenovirus type 26 expressing the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein: the active ingredient that enters human cells and elicits the immune response without replication.
  • Citric acid monohydrate: an antioxidant that helps maintain stability of the active ingredient
  • Trisodium citrate dihydrate: used to help control pH (acidity)
  • Ethanol: used to keep the other ingredients dissolved and in solution form
  • 2-hydroxypropyl-?-cyclodextrin (HBCD): used to improve the solubility and stability of the active ingredient
  • Polysorbate-80: this is a common food additive used in several vaccines as an emulsifier (to hold other ingredients together). Compared with its use in foods, there is very little polysorbate-80 in vaccines.
  • Sodium chloride: a salt used to control acidity and tonicity of the solution

Q: How are the vaccine options different?

A: The key difference between the Janssen (Johnson & Johnson) vaccine and the Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna vaccines is that the Janssen vaccine requires only one dose. Both the Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna vaccine require two doses.

Additionally, the Janssen vaccine uses an inactivated adenovirus (adenovirus 26; similar to the virus that causes the common cold) instead of the mRNA technology used in the Moderna and Pfizer/BioNTech vaccines. While Moderna and Pfizer both use the same technology, they contain slightly different mRNAs and different ingredients used to protect the mRNA, maintain the pH and stabilize the solution.

All three vaccines effectively prevent serious illness and death from COVID-19 and have similar potential side effects.

Q: Will adverse reactions of the COVID-19 Vaccine be covered under Workers’ Compensation?

A: No. Workers’ Compensation covers lost wages and medical treatment resulting from an employee’s work-related injury or illness. Employees are receiving the vaccination on a voluntary basis and Workers’ Compensation coverage is not applicable in the event of any complications. However, serious illness resulting in lost work time as a result of any administered vaccine could be covered by FMLA and/or extended sick pay, and the employee would follow our normal HR and Work Connections process.

Q: Will COVID-19 PTO be available for use to cover absences related to side effects of the vaccine? 

A: No, COVID-19 PTO will not be available to cover absences related to any potential side effects of the vaccine.  PTO/Sick time will need to be used if any time off is needed.

Q: Are managers/supervisors giving employees time during their shifts to go get vaccinated, or do they have to go on personal time?

A: Managers and supervisors are encouraged to be flexible and accommodating to employees when it comes to scheduling their vaccine appointments. However, this may vary from unit to unit due to clinical and staffing needs. There may be situations where it would be best for employees to schedule their vaccination before or after their shifts or during their breaks.

Q: How much does the COVID-19 vaccine cost?

A: There is no out-of-pocket cost to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. The federal government is providing the vaccine itself at no cost to patients.

There is a vaccine administration fee which covers supplies, facilities, staffing and other expenses that will be covered in full by your insurance company, Medicaid, Medicare, or the federal government if you do not have insurance.

Q: Where can my patients/family members/friends find more information on Michigan Medicine’s COVID-19 vaccine distribution plans and vaccine clinics?

A: Information for patients, family members, and the broader community can be found on the COVID-19 vaccine page of uofmhealth.org.

This site also features a chat bot to provide real-time answers to common questions on COVID-19 disease, vaccines, options for receiving care during the pandemic (including virtual care), visitor restrictions, parking and testing.

Effectiveness and safety

Q: How do the vaccines work?

A: Each vaccine sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Operation Warp Speed uses a slightly different approach with the same goal: to induce an immune response in the body against SARS-CoV2, the virus that causes COVID-19. The vaccines produced by Pfizer and Moderna are both mRNA vaccines. The Janssen vaccine (from Johnson & Johnson) is a viral vector vaccine.

The Pfizer and Moderna mRNA vaccines contain a message from the COVID-19 virus that that gives our cells instructions for how to make a harmless protein that is unique to the virus.

After our cells make copies of the protein, they destroy the genetic material from the vaccine. Our bodies also recognize that the protein should not be there and build immune cells that will remember how to fight the virus that causes COVID-19 if we are exposed in the future. Both vaccines require two shots, with the second shot received 21 to 28 days after the first, depending on the vaccine.

The Janssen vaccine creates a similar immune system response but uses an inactivated harmless cold virus (adenovirus 26) to deliver instructions to your immune system for fighting the virus that causes COVID-19. It requires only one shot.

Q: How did a vaccine get developed and approved so quickly? Was the process rushed?

A: Producing a vaccine against COVID-19 has been the top priority of scientists and governments around the world to help bring an end to the pandemic. With the coordinated and enormous investment of resources, development of these vaccines has been accelerated, all while maintaining standards for safety and efficacy. Rather than eliminating steps from traditional vaccine development timelines, steps are proceeding simultaneously, such as scaling up manufacturing while safety and efficacy data are being collected. 

Q: Are the vaccines safe?

A: Before receiving approval for emergency use, pharmaceutical companies must provide evidence that their vaccines are safe. A team of experts from the FDA and the CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices reviewed all available data on the safety and efficacy of the vaccines before recommending them for use.

Q: Will the vaccine be safe for pregnant and lactating women and women trying to conceive?

A: With the information currently available, we at Michigan Medicine believe the benefit of receiving the COVID-19 vaccine is greater than the risks of getting COVID-19 for women who are pregnant, breastfeeding or trying to conceive. There is no specific safety information about the COVID-19 vaccine in pregnancy because pregnancy women were not included in the early studies. However, most scientists, doctors and national organizations support pregnant women receiving the vaccine because the risks of COVID-19 in pregnancy can be severe.

Additionally, the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine does not recommend stopping breastfeeding for people who get the COVID-19 vaccine and the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology advises that it is not necessary to delay pregnancy after completing both doses of the vaccine. To help make your decision about receiving the vaccine, be sure to speak with your health care provider.

Q: I have allergies that require me to get a special flu vaccine every year. Is it safe for me to get this vaccine? 

A: According to the CDC, people who have experienced severe reactions to prior vaccines or injectable drugs can still get the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine for COVID-19. When you arrive for your vaccination, be sure to tell the medical personnel who are administering your vaccine that you may be at risk for an allergic reaction. 

You should plan to stay in the immediate area for at least 15 minutes (30 minutes for anyone with a history of severe reactions) following your vaccination so the medical team can monitor you. If you have an EpiPen for your allergies, please bring it with you. 

Q: Can the COVID-19 vaccine be administered with other vaccines?

A: The CDC has updated guidance around receiving the COVID-19 vaccine with other non-COVID-19 vaccines. Previously, the guidance was to have a minimum 14-day interval between the COVID-19 vaccine and any other vaccine. The new guidance now states that the COVID-19 vaccine and other vaccines may be administered without regard to timing. This includes simultaneous administration of COVID-19 vaccine and other vaccines on the same day, as well as co-administration within 14 days.

Q: Is the vaccine safe for people with conditions or medications that can weaken the immune system?

A: The early clinical trials did not test the vaccines in these populations but based on the current data, the benefit of receiving the COVID-19 vaccine is greater than the risks of getting COVID-19. Talk to your health care provider about the potential risks and benefits of the vaccine in your specific situation. 

Q: Are the current vaccines being administered protective against the new variants identified?

A: The Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine appears to be effective against the B.1.1.7 variant of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, based on early research. A small study conducted by Pfizer Inc. and the University of Texas Medical Branch examined the effectiveness of the Pfizer/BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine, and the initial results indicate that the vaccine should be protective against the B.1.1.7 variant. Initial results of the study, which has not yet been peer reviewed, are available here.

For recipients of the Moderna vaccine, the company has also announced that it appears to be effective against the new strains emerging from the U.K. and Republic of South Africa. More information can be found in this press release from Moderna.

These variants are still relatively new so further research is ongoing.  

Q: If I have allergies and am worried about an allergic reaction, should I go to a specific vaccine clinic location?

A: Every Michigan Medicine vaccine clinic location is equipped to administer COVID-19 vaccines safely. When scheduling your vaccine appointment in your MyUofMHealth portal account, you will be asked a question about allergic or anaphylactic reactions. Similarly, you will be asked this question again at the time of vaccination. Please answer the question in order to schedule your vaccine appointment.

If you have a history of allergies, you will be observed for a longer period of time after your injection (at least 30 minutes) by medical personnel onsite and should report any symptoms to the charge nurse during your observation period. Medical staff at all locations are equipped with anaphylaxis kits and supplies to quickly treat anyone experiencing an allergic reaction to the vaccine. 

Vaccine eligibility

Q: Who is currently eligible to be vaccinated at Michigan Medicine?

A: All individuals age 12 years and older are eligible to receive a COVID-19 vaccine. Pfizer is currently the only vaccine option approved by the FDA and CDC for those age 12-15 years. More information on scheduling an appointment for COVID-19 vaccine can be found on the “Our Vaccine Scheduling Process” page of the Michigan Medicine website.

Michigan Medicine employees who would like to schedule a vaccine appointment have the following options:

  • Occupational Health Services (OHS) is currently offering walk-in COVID-19 vaccinations from 7 a.m. – 4 p.m. each day. An employee ID is required to be vaccinated.
  • If you are also a Michigan Medicine patient, you can call the COVID-19 Vaccine Scheduling Call Center at (734) 763-6336 or visit your MyUofMHealth.org patient portal account to schedule an appointment. You can visit https://www.uofmhealth.org/coronavirus/vaccine-info-update for more information. 

If you have any other questions regarding vaccination, please call OHS at (734) 764-8021. 

Q: Will the vaccine be mandatory? Do I need the vaccine if I primarily work remotely?

A: At this time, the COVID-19 vaccine is not mandatory. We will be sharing additional safety & efficacy data to help build awareness and understanding, and support informed individual decision making. 

We encourage all University of Michigan faculty, staff, and learners to get vaccinated against COVID-19, including those who are currently working remotely.

Q: Can I get the vaccine if I’ve had COVID-19 or think I may have had COVID-19 in the past?

A: Scheduling your appointment at a later date is recommended if you have been diagnosed with COVID-19 in the last 10 days. If it has been longer than 10 days, according to CDC, vaccination should be offered to persons regardless of history of prior symptomatic or asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection. Data from phase 2/3 clinical trials suggest vaccination is safe and likely efficacious in these people.

Current evidence suggests that people who have had COVID-19 may be protected for up to 90 days after their initial infection, so they may decide to wait until after this period, if desired.

Q: If staff are not comfortable with getting the vaccine right away, will there be another chance to get vaccinated at a later date?

A: The goal is to vaccinate all members of our community but we understand there may be uncertainty about the vaccines right now. Any vaccine recommended by the CDC Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices will be reviewed for safety and efficacy. Vaccine doses are now widely available across the country so if you were unsure at first but now wish to receive a vaccine, you can register for an appointment at Michigan Medicine or a nearby retail pharmacy.  

Q: I am eligible to receive a vaccine through the university. Can my family members get vaccinated too? 

A: Yes, at this time all individuals age 12 years and older are able to be vaccinated through Michigan Medicine. Pfizer is currently the only vaccine option approved by the FDA and CDC for individuals age 12-15 years. For more information on how to register yourself and your family members for a vaccine appointment, visit the “Our Vaccine Scheduling Process” page of the Michigan Medicine website. 

Q: Are there any restrictions about who can receive the COVID-19 vaccine?

A: Yes, there are some clinical considerations to keep in mind when scheduling your appointment for a COVID-19 vaccine. Vaccination will not be administered if any of the following are true, and scheduling your appointment at a later date is recommended: 

  • You have been diagnosed with COVID-19 in the last 10 days 
  • You have received an infusion of COVID-19 monoclonal antibodies in the past 90 days

Q: Are new Michigan Medicine employees eligible for a vaccine through the health system? How do we schedule an appointment?

A: Yes, all Michigan Medicine faculty, staff, and learners are eligible to receive a COVID-19 vaccine through the health system. When you are onboarding with your new position, please work with your manager who will help you with the process to schedule your vaccination.

All Michigan Medicine faculty, staff, and learners have the following options to receive a vaccine:

  • Occupational Health Services (OHS) is currently offering walk-in COVID-19 vaccinations from 7 a.m. – 4 p.m. each day. An employee ID is required to be vaccinated.
  • If you are also a Michigan Medicine patient, you can call the COVID-19 Vaccine Scheduling Call Center at (734) 763-6336 or visit your MyUofMHealth.org patient portal account to schedule an appointment. You can visit https://www.uofmhealth.org/coronavirus/vaccine-info-update for more information. 

If you have any other questions regarding vaccination, please call OHS at (734) 764-8021. 

Logistics

Q: If I am eligible to receive the vaccine, how do I schedule an appointment?

A: All Michigan Medicine faculty, staff, and learners have the following options to receive a COVID-19 vaccine:

  • Occupational Health Services (OHS) is currently offering walk-in COVID-19 vaccinations from 7 a.m. – 4 p.m. each day. An employee ID is required to be vaccinated.
  • If you are also a Michigan Medicine patient, you can call the COVID-19 Vaccine Scheduling Call Center at (734) 763-6336 or visit your MyUofMHealth.org patient portal account to schedule an appointment. You can visit https://www.uofmhealth.org/coronavirus/vaccine-info-update for more information. 

If you have any other questions regarding vaccination, please call OHS at (734) 764-8021. 

Q: Will we be able to choose which vaccine we want?

A: Michigan Medicine is only offering one vaccine at each clinic location so if you would like to receive a specific vaccine, you will need to schedule an appointment at a clinic offering that vaccine. Currently, our U-M North Campus Research Complex clinic is offering appointments for the Pfizer vaccine, and our Brighton Health Center and Northville Health Center vaccine clinics are offering appointments for the Moderna vaccine.

Q: How long do you anticipate it to be until all who want a vaccination will be able to receive one?

A: Availability of COVID-19 vaccine doses has increased significantly since they were first rolled out. Any individual age 16 years and older is now eligible to receive a vaccine through health care organizations or retail pharmacies.

Q: I scheduled an appointment but can no longer make it. What do I do?

A: If you scheduled an appointment through your MyUofMHealth Patient Portal account, you are able to cancel or reschedule your appointment if needed, for both first and second dose appointments. To cancel or reschedule, go to the Menu and select Visits. Select your vaccination appointment, then click Cancel appointment. You will then be able to reschedule using the scheduling ticket that appears on your homepage.

Q: What locations are currently available for getting my COVID-19 vaccine?

A: Currently, Michigan Medicine is administering vaccines in the following locations:

  • Occupational Health Services (for employees only)
  • Brighton Health Center (Moderna)
  • North Campus Research Complex (Pfizer)
  • Northville Health Center (Moderna)

You will be able to select a time and date at your preferred location when scheduling your appointment in your MyUofMHealth account.

Q: I do not have a medical record number (MRN). Can I set one up online?

A: Yes, U-M campus employees and students can now fill out an online form to establish a medical record number. The form is accessible on the MyUofMHealth homepage near the top of the page. Just click on the Blue Queue Member MRN Creation link and you will be taken to the online form to fill out.

You will need your UMID number. This form can be used by all Michigan Medicine and University of Michigan faculty, staff and students (U of M personnel).

Q: I lost the vaccine card that was given to me at my first dose appointment. Can I get another one? Do I need it to get my second dose?

A: If you lost or misplaced the vaccine card provided at your first dose appointment, you can get a new one at your second dose. Just ask your vaccinator for a new copy. Once you have received both doses, your patient record in the MyUofMHealth patient portal will reflect your COVID-19 vaccine information, along with all previous vaccinations.

It is unclear at this time if having a specific “vaccination card” for the COVID-19 vaccine will be required at any point, so we do encourage you to keep your card in a safe place. If you lose the card and need proof of vaccination, you can access your vaccination history in your MyUofMHealth patient portal account.

From the MyUofMHealth Welcome page, click on the Menu (top left) and select Health Summary. All your past immunization with Michigan Medicine will be available under the Immunizations tab. You can print this entire page by selecting FilePrint from the browser menu.

Q: What accommodations are available at vaccine clinics for patients who need special accommodations?

A: Michigan Medicine is committed to ensuring all of our patients are able to be vaccinated safely. We offer the following amenities to meet the needs of all patients:

  • enclosed vaccination area for anyone who needs privacy; this space can also be used if you are wearing clothing that does not enable you to easily expose your arm
  • areas for individuals with sensory-related disabilities and/or limited sensory
  • wheelchairs readily available and signage to indicate wheelchair accessible doors, lines, entrances, restrooms
  • onsite staff who can assist individuals with hearing and/or sight-related needs; white boards and pens for communicating with patients who are hard of hearing; clear masks for staff to wear for people who need to lip read
  • remote interpreters for patients who are Deaf, hard of hearing or for those with Limited English proficiency
  • directional signs and screening tools in large print
  • screening questions and patient information translated in 7 written languages
  • chairs available for anyone unable to stand if there is a line, safely spaced six feet apart
  • accommodations for a support person to accompany a patient of medically necessary, and companion seating in the waiting area

Q: How does the state determine how many vaccine doses Michigan Medicine receives? 

A: When it comes to supplying health systems and local health departments with vaccines to administer, the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) is currently using a model that allocates 60% to local health departments and 40% to hospitals/health systems.  The state is looking to local health departments to serve in key roles administering and coordinating administration of the vaccine to the state’s citizens. Michigan Medicine is actively coordinating with the Washtenaw County Health Department and other provider organizations in the region to optimize vaccine dose delivery to our community. 

The state has also begun allocating doses using a social vulnerability index (SVI) established by the CDC. More information on the SVI and how it is used in Michigan can be found on the Michigan Department of Health & Human Services website or in this PowerPoint presentation on the site.  

Second dose scheduling

Q: I received my first dose but do not have an appointment for my second dose. How do I schedule my second dose?

A: After completing your first dose appointment, you will receive a MyUofMHealth portal message and scheduling ticket to self-schedule your second dose. It should appear in your patient portal account immediately after receiving your first dose. If you are not able to schedule your second dose, ask the charge nurse in the observation area for help before leaving the clinic location.

Q: I need to reschedule my appointment for my second dose of the vaccine. How do I do that?

A: If you need to reschedule the appointment for your second dose for any reason, you must do so through your MyUofMHealth account.

When reviewing the Appointment Details for the second dose appointment within your account, choose Reschedule Appointment if you are logged in through a web browser or Reschedule or cancel if you are logged in through the mobile app. This also applies if you accidentally scheduled an appointment for the wrong date or time. 

Q: I received my first dose at Michigan Stadium but saw appointments for a second dose available at a different location that is closer to my home. Can I schedule my second dose at a different location than my first?

A: Yes, if there are appointments offered for your second dose available at a location that is different from where you received your first dose, you can schedule in your second dose in a different location from where you received your first dose. Both locations must be Michigan Medicine vaccination sites. You cannot receive your second dose through a different health system or outside agency (county or state health department, CVS, Walgreens, etc.) if you received your first dose from Michigan Medicine.

Q: When should I receive the invitation to schedule my second dose?

A: Once your first dose has been completed, a scheduling ticket for your second dose should appear nearly instantaneously in your MyUofMHealth portal. If you are able to check on your smart phone, check your email or the MyUofMHealth app for notice of second dose scheduling. If you do not have an invitation to schedule your second dose, be sure to check with the charge nurse or any representative in the observation area before leaving. Your first dose appointment must be closed in your patient portal account in order for the scheduling ticket for the second dose to appear.

After getting vaccinated

Q: What are the anticipated side effects of the vaccine?

A: Common side effects that have been reported with available COVID-19 vaccines include:

  • injection site pain
  • tiredness
  • headache
  • muscle pain
  • chills
  • joint pain
  • fever
  • injection site swelling
  • injection site redness
  • nausea
  • feeling unwell
  • swollen lymph nodes (lymphadenopathy)

Side effects of individual COVID-19 vaccines may vary. You can find more information about what to expect after getting vaccinated on the CDC website: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/expect/after.html

Q: I was vaccinated yesterday and now I have a fever so I have a red “X” on my ResponsiBLUE app. What do I do?

A: If you received your vaccine within the last 48 hours and developed a fever (temperature >100.4F or 38C), you should not come to work. You may continue to work if you have fatigue, headache or muscle aches following vaccination, as long as you feel well enough.

You should contact OHS if any of these symptoms persist for more than 48 hours after vaccination. If you have questions you can email OHS at OHS-covidvaccine@med.umich.edu or call them at (734) 764-8021. You can also visit the Occupational Health Services website for information.

Q: How long do side effects from the vaccine typically last?

A: Side effects are generally mild but may affect your ability to do daily activities. Any side effects should diminish after a day or two.

In most cases, discomfort from fever or pain is normal. However, if the redness or tenderness where you got the shot increases after 24 hours OR if your side effects are worrying you or do not seem to be going away after a few days, you should contact Occupational Health Services at (734) 764-8021 (available 7am-5pm 7 days per week)

Q: I received my vaccine last week and now have a cough. What should I do?

A: A new cough is not a common symptom associated with the COVID-19 vaccine. Call OHS (734-764-8021) if you develop any of the following symptoms: 

  • Shortness of breath
  • Upper respiratory symptoms (e.g., runny nose, congestion, sore throat)
  • Loss of sense of smell or taste

Q: Can I take a photo or post a selfie while getting my vaccine? Can I bring someone with me to take my photo?

A: We know that everyone is looking for ways to help fight the COVID-19 pandemic, and sharing personal stories about getting vaccinated is a great way to encourage others in the community to get vaccinated as doses become more available. 

You are more than welcome to take photos and share your personal message with friends and others on social media, however, we do ask that you do not bring a friend, family member, or colleague with you to your vaccination appointment. It is important to continue practicing social distancing and limit the number of people in the vaccination area.

Q: If all members of the health care team are vaccinated, do we still need to test our patients for COVID-19 prior to surgery or procedures?

A: Yes, at this time it is important to continue following all precautions for reducing the spread of COVID-19. While the vaccine has been shown to be highly effective, the efficacy is not 100% so we must continue using all of the tools we have to reduce the spread, including pre-procedural testing and utilizing personal protective equipment (PPE).

Additionally, the evidence supports a reduction in symptomatic events; however, asymptomatic events were not studied in the vaccine trials. This means that we do not yet know for certain whether those that have been vaccinated are able to carry and spread virus without experiencing symptoms, and further evidence is needed.

As a reminder, Michigan Medicine guidelines for use of PPE include:

  • All staff should wear a standard medical mask (ear loop or tie back) mask at all times. In addition, everyone should use eye protection for all patient facing activities.
  • Personal glass wearers should use side shields or goggles over their regular glasses. A face shield is also acceptable.
  • Staff performing high risk AGPs in asymptomatic patients with negative COVID tests should wear a fit-tested N-95 respirator and eye protection or PAPR.
  • Special Pathogens Precautions are required for patients with known COVID-19 infection or for those with symptoms awaiting COVID-19 test results. Staff should wear a fit-tested N-95 respirator and eye protection or PAPR, a gown and gloves.

We will continue to answer questions as we learn more and get further into vaccine planning.

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